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Vineland (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin)
Thomas Pynchon
Tristes Tropiques
Claude Lévi-Strauss, Patrick Wilcken, John Weightman, Doreen Weightman
Richard III
William Shakespeare
The Dwarf
Alexandra Dick, Pär Lagerkvist
The Collected Poems of Wilfred Owen
Wilfred Owen, Cecil Day-Lewis
Labyrinths
Richard Wolin
Giotto to Dürer: Early Renaissance Painting in the National Gallery
Jill Dunkerton, Susan Foister, Dillian Gordon, Nicholas Penny
Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics
Hubert L. Dreyfus, Paul Rabinow
Gravity's Rainbow
Thomas Pynchon
A Gravity's Rainbow Companion: Sources and Contexts for Pynchon's Novel
Steven Weisenburger
Breach of Trust: How the Warren Commission Failed the Nation And Why - Gerald D. McKnight It is well known that anyone who takes an interest in the assassinations of John and Robert F. Kennedy must be something of a crank, since most sane people "don't go in for conspiracies". I agree with this sentiment entirely. Most of the books written on these topics are wild, speculative, unreliable -- and give a bad odor to the entire topic.

This particular book is one of the few scholarly treatments of the Warren Commission -- and though somewhat dense and plodding, it is thorough -- exhaustively so -- and dismantles the Warren Commission brick by brick on a sound evidentiary basis. The author teaches at Hood College in Maryland, which shows that reputable schools will not support this type of work. But one should still read this and some of the other books I've marked in this category for oneself.

The ARRB was set up by Congressional Act in 1992:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_Records_Review_Board

When I was in Dealey Plaza, I noticed a commemorative bronze-colored plaque laid in the pavement on Elm St., alongside the spot where the first bullet would have struck JFK. The plaque said that it had been laid in 1993 by order of the Department of the Interior. I found this last indication quite peculiar, since I would have thought that a plaque of this sort would have been laid 30 years earlier, and by local ordinance.